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Updated Guide to Speech Recognition is Published

by Paul Nisbet

on Mon May 29, 2017

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An updated version of the excellent Speech Recognition as AT (Assistive Technology) for Writing, by Daniel Cochrane and Kelly Key, has just been published and is now available.

Speech recognition (where you talk or dictate to your computer, tablet or smartphone) can be hugely empowering for many learners who have difficulty with handwriting, typing or spelling - see our recent Talking in Exams Report.

This guide is a concise introduction if you are interested in speech recognition, and you want to:

  • Consider it!
  • Try it!
  • Assess it!
  • Implement it!

Cochrane and Key suggest that speech recognition is one possible tool in a 'toolbelt' of strategies and methods that students may use, depending on the task and the context - for example, dictating text during a class activity may not always be practical.

They give useful pointers to consider for deciding whether to introduce the free internet-based speech recognition systems such as Siri or Google Docs, or the commercial programs such as Dragon NaturallySpeaking.

The authors point out that the only way to find out whether speech recognition is appropriate is to try it, and to teach learners how to use it, and they offer eight 'Scaffolded Steps to Teach the Speech Recognition Writing process'. They also offer advice on setting up the software and on assessing the impact of the technology.

For more on speech recognition visit the CALL Speech Recognition pages.

Tags: speech recognition

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